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Old 11-15-2006, 06:44 AM   #166
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Hey I delivered two in 2003 & 2004.....

I am the man!
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Old 11-16-2006, 09:08 AM   #167
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SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — About 30 parents and their children sat in front of an airline counter Wednesday to protest the treatment of a passenger who said she was kicked off a plane for breast-feeding her child.

Mothers breast-fed their children and held up signs during the "nurse-in."

"I just think it's unbelievable that it happened in 2006, especially in Vermont" said Lora McAllister, a Swanton mother. "It's kind of mind boggling."

Emily Gillette of Santa Fe, had complained that she was kicked off an airplane because she was nursing her baby.

A complaint against two airlines was filed with the Vermont Human Rights, although Executive Director Robert Appel said he was barred by state law from confirming the complaint. He did say state law allows a mother to breast-feed in public.

Elizabeth Boepple, a lawyer hired by Gillette, 27, confirmed that Gillette filed the complaint late last week against Delta Air Lines and Freedom Airlines. Freedom was operating the Delta commuter flight between Burlington and New York City.

A Freedom spokesman said Gillette was asked to leave the flight after she declined a flight attendant's offer of a blanket.

"I was horrified that a mother could be humiliated like that," said Caroline Beer, 34, of Burlington.



They said she wasn't being discreet enough and offered her a blanket, which she declined

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15720339/
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Old 11-16-2006, 09:56 AM   #168
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Wow, is it really so hard not to stare at someone breast feeding? They'd rather hear a hungry baby screaming the entire flight than turn away for five minutes?
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Old 11-16-2006, 12:19 PM   #169
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I'll just say that modesty goes a long way---just some respect for our bodies/our relationships in general.
Any breast feeding mom can throw a beautiful shawl in the diaper bag to nurture her relationship/feeding time with her baby.
To me this demonstrates a deep respect for themselves, their babies, and for those around them. Intimacy is a beautiful thing.
There is no need to involve everyone in a public breast feeding ritual.
Just because you can doesn't mean you should.
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Old 11-18-2006, 09:31 AM   #170
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I have never seen a woman breast feed a baby in public in an immodest way aka with her entire breast exposed for all to see. Never seen it personally

(AP)A commuter airline has disciplined a flight attendant who ordered a passenger off a plane for refusing to cover herself with a blanket while breast-feeding her toddler, the airline said Friday.

Freedom Airlines spokesman Paul Skellon did not specify the discipline in an e-mail announcing the action against the employee who had Emily Gillette, of Santa Fe, N.M., removed from the plane Oct. 13 at Burlington International Airport.

Gillette, 27, said she was breast-feeding her 22-month-old daughter in a window seat in the next-to-last row, with no part of her breast showing and her husband between her and the aisle.

The flight attendant tried to hand her a blanket and told her to cover up, Gillette said. She declined, telling the flight attendant she had a legal right to nurse her daughter. Breast-feeding is protected under state law.

The case received broad news coverage this week, days after Gillette filed a complaint with the Vermont Human Rights Commission. On Wednesday, about 30 parents and their children protested the airline's treatment of Gillette by staging a "nurse-in" at the Burlington airport.

Skellon said that after the flight attendant ordered Gillette off the plane, the captain of the Delta Air Lines flight being operated by Freedom apologized and asked her family to reboard, but they refused.

Gillette, however, said the airline never offered her a chance to get back on board the New York-bound plane. "I would have jumped at the opportunity," she said.

Delta paid for a hotel room and rebooked the family on a different airline the next day.
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Old 11-18-2006, 03:11 PM   #171
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Seems to me this didn't become a "public ritual" until the flight attendant called attention to the whole situation by insisting she wasn't covered up enough. The other passengers probably weren't even aware of what was going on until that happened.
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Old 11-20-2006, 01:47 PM   #172
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Ew. that was just mean. If the woman was in a corner with her husband between her and the passageway - not to mention the tall seats, who would have even noticed?
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Old 11-21-2006, 08:46 AM   #173
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By Raja Mishra, Boston Globe Staff | November 21, 2006

After waiting five hours at the Burlington, Vt., airport, Emily Gillette finally boarded a Delta commuter flight and discreetly began breast-feeding her exhausted toddler. And that's when the trouble started.

"The flight attendant said, 'You are offending me,' " Gillette recalled yesterday in a telephone interview from her home in New Mexico. "I've always breast-fed my daughter when she wants, where she wants."

After she, her husband, and 22-month-old daughter were kicked off the plane last month, Gillette, 27, filed a discrimination complaint with the Vermont Human Rights Commission. As word of the case spread on online mothering forums, outrage boiled.

Today, with the frantic Thanksgiving travel week underway, dozens of self-proclaimed "lactivists" plan to suckle their infants in front of Delta ticketing counters around the nation, including at Logan International Airport.

The goals of the protest are to force airlines to review their breast-feeding policies and to pressure Congress to pass protections for breast-feeding women in the workplace, said Elizabeth A. Boepple of Manchester, Vt., Gillette's lawyer and one of the protest organizers.

Delta has reprimanded the flight attendant in the Gillette case, and a spokesman has said that women can breast-feed on any Delta plane. But Gillette said she will push her case until the airline issues that policy in writing, and a spokesman said yesterday that Delta has no plans to do so.

The case is another chapter in the debate pitting nursing mothers' rights against notions of propriety. Public nudity remains largely forbidden: Janet Jackson's bared breast during the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show sparked national outrage. At the same time, researchers have established that breast-feeding delivers considerable long-term health benefits for infants and mothers.

To date, 38 states have passed laws protecting a woman's right to breast-feed at restaurants, malls, and other public places. The states include Vermont, but not Massachusetts, where state lawmakers are considering such a bill.

"It's prudishness. People here confuse a simple act which is so useful with being flagrant," said state Senator Susan C. Fargo, the Lincoln Democrat sponsoring the bill. "Society's going to have to get used to it."

Fargo said she was unsure if the proposal will pass in the current legislative session, which ends in January. It remains in a Senate committee, where several earlier versions died in recent years.

"Most of the committee members have been men, and they just weren't interested," she said. "But it's not a women's issue. It's a health issue."

Repeated studies have shown that breast milk gives infants lasting protection against colds, flu, infections, and pneumonia, while possibly reducing the likelihood of obesity, which can lead to heart disease and diabetes. Nursing also helps mothers lose pregnancy weight quickly. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that new mothers give only breast milk for the first six months of a child's life, and says there is no evidence of harm if breastfeeding continues into a child's third year.

Nonetheless, every few months, a breast-feeding controversy seems to erupt somewhere in the United States. In July, activists protested after Victoria's Secret stores in Massachusetts and Wisconsin kicked out women for breast-feeding. Last year, Barbara Walters said on ABC's "The View" that a breast-feeding woman on a flight she had taken made her feel awkward. Activists, with babies in tow, showed up in force outside ABC News headquarters in New York City days later.

Gillette, who lives in Espanola, N.M., said she had taken at least two-dozen flights during which she breast-fed her daughter, River. On Oct. 13, she was flying from Burlington to New York on Freedom Airlines, a Delta commuter affiliate required to follow Delta's policies.

When Gillette started breast-feeding as the plane sat at the gate, the female flight attendant, who has not been named by Delta, demanded that Gillette cover up with a blanket. Gillette said that she was in the rear of the plane at a window seat, with her shirt covering most of her breast.

"I said I would not put a blanket over my child's head," Gillette said. "The next thing we know, there was a Delta ticket agent standing over us. I was just shocked."

Delta provided her family with a hotel room that night and another flight to New York the next day. "Delta called back a few days later and said it does not take responsibility for this," Gillette said.

Delta has until Nov. 27 to respond to her complaint to the human rights commission. If the case is not settled, the commission must consider whether to file a civil lawsuit against the airline.

"Delta as an airline fully supports mothers' rights to breast-feed babies on the aircraft," airline spokesman Anthony Black said yesterday. "We regret the decision that had the passenger removed from that flight, as it was not in keeping with our high service standards."

The company that owns Freedom Airlines, Mesa Air Group Inc., issued a statement saying it supported the right to breast-feed on flights.
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Old 11-21-2006, 12:19 PM   #174
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Ten bucks says the attendant was offended by the age of the baby and not by breast feeding in general. There's another cultural "norm" that needs work - assuming it's gross to breast feed beyond six months.
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Old 11-22-2006, 06:59 PM   #175
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Quote:
Originally posted by MrsSpringsteen


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Old 11-22-2006, 08:04 PM   #176
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Breasts are a lot like computer games.

They are intended for the kids, but the fathers always end up playing with them.

[ducking rotten fruit]
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Old 11-22-2006, 09:53 PM   #177
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No bet, Liesje - AMERICANS are prudes, m'kay?
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Old 11-22-2006, 11:08 PM   #178
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No bet, Liesje - AMERICANS are prudes, m'kay?
huh?
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Old 11-23-2006, 12:21 PM   #179
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I was kidding, Lies - it was a South park joke. I'm pretty sure the woman was all huffy because a toddler was having a meal.:P
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Old 11-24-2006, 11:24 AM   #180
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The magazine cover is both tasteful and discreet. I agree with many posters that the U.S. is too uptight about issues such as this and at the same time too sexualized in its media.

Hearing how many Iraqi civilians have been killed today or how many people have died from AIDS or Malaria - now THAT'S offensive.
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