Disabled Host Of Kids' TV Show "Scares Kids" - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-26-2009, 11:16 AM   #1
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,984
Local Time: 02:35 PM
Disabled Host Of Kids' TV Show "Scares Kids"

So now kids have to be shielded from people with disabilities? I agree, it's absolutely the parents' projections and the extreme sheltering of some kids. Maybe that overbearing parenting is creating non-physical disabilities in some kids. Granted it's only a handful of complainers-but should there be a single one? I say emphatically, no. What are these parents going to tell their kids when they see disabled people outside of the tv world? They don't want to have to address such issues? Wow, that's too bad


One-armed TV host scares kids, parents say

Experts say that adults’ wariness of BBC TV show host is ‘old-fashioned’
By Mike Celizic
TODAYShow.com contributor
updated 8:46 a.m. ET, Thurs., Feb. 26, 2009

When the BBC hired a pretty young actress to co-host a daily program for toddlers, it never expected viewers to complain that the young woman might give their children nightmares.

“I didn't want to let my children watch the filler bits on the bedtime hour last night because I know it would have played on my eldest daughter's mind and possibly caused sleep problems,” wrote one viewer in an e-mail to the British television network after seeing Cerrie Burnell play games and read children’s stories.

The viewer’s problem? Burnell was born with an incomplete right arm that ends in a stump below her elbow.

According to a BBC report, most viewers have been supportive of Burnell, who took over a daily slot on the BBC’s children’s network, CBeebies, at the beginning of February with Alex Winters. But a handful have written to the station complaining about her disability. Some say she may frighten the children. Others accuse the network of going overboard in the interests of diversity. Some say they don’t want to have to address such issues with very young children.

Burnell, who has a 4-month-old daughter, seems unfazed by the controversy. “Children come up to me in the street every day and say 'What's that?' I wouldn't say they're frightened but certainly they're inquisitive,” she told BBC magazine. "I would always take the time to explain to a child. All they want is an explanation. They want to know 'What's that?' and 'What's happened?' and 'Why are you different?' And then they will move on."

Barbara Otto, the executive director of Health & Disability Advocates, a national American organization that lobbies, said in a phone interview that she would be surprised if a person like Burnell caused a similar reaction in the United States.

The Americans with Disabilities Education Act has mainstreamed as many disabled children as possible into regular schools. “We have community inclusion of people with disabilities,” she said. “Kids are going to school with people with different abilities. In the United States, this would be unheard of.”

In England, experts have noted that small children do not normally have difficulty dealing with people who are different. Where adults may turn their heads away from someone in a wheelchair, toddlers will walk right up to them and ask them about their chair. They don’t ask what’s wrong, but rather what is.

“They acknowledge it, they don’t look away,” Otto said of small children. “They ask what happened, not out of horror or disgust or fear. The want to know what happened. A responsible adult tells them: ‘Here’s what the situation is.’”

Are adults the problem?

England has non-discrimination laws similar to those in America. The problem isn’t with kids but with adults, Sir Bert Massie of Great Britain’s Equality and Human Rights Commission told the BBC.

"I think what's happening is a number of adults do have prejudices, do have very negative views about disabled people, and instead of admitting the views are their own, they're projecting them on to their children and saying the children are doing this,” he is quoted as saying.

Otto agreed. “It’s the adults,” she said, noting that Baby Boomers were raised in an era when the disabled were excluded from mainstream society. “People with disabilities were ‘the others.’ They were went away to live in institutions. A lot of that changed starting in the 1970s and 80s. It’s an old-fashioned notion.”

Otto said the reaction to Burnell is symptomatic of a larger issue some parents today are trying to cope with.

“This situation really speaks to an issue we’re seeing in parenting today,” Otto said. “Given the challenges of being a parent and the inability to control what our kids are exposed to, some parents are having a real drastic reaction. Maybe this is a part of it. Some people strive to shelter their children as long as they can. I suppose you see that everywhere. You see people home-school their kids because they don’t want them in an environment where they can’t control what they’re doing every minute of the day.”

Although the target of complaints, Burnell did not attempt to tell parents how to raise their children. “I'd never comment on anyone's parenting or the time for them to have a discussion with their child about disabilities,” she told the BBC. "It's a totally personal thing and people have to do it when they feel comfortable to do it. But I would just hope that, I guess, me being on CBeebies would present an opportunity for them to do that in the comfort of their own home."
__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 11:24 AM   #2
Blue Crack Addict
 
DaveC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: illegitimi non carborundum
Posts: 17,408
Local Time: 02:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsSpringsteen View Post
All they want is an explanation.

The want to know what happened. A responsible adult tells them
This is true of every child I've ever met.
__________________

__________________
DaveC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 11:49 AM   #3
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 02:35 PM
Children need an explanation as to why. I have always explained it to my kids as it is, nothing like they're not as lucky as you or you were blessed which are reasons I've heard before.

Its sad that parents are complaining and not explaining.
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 11:53 AM   #4
ONE
love, blood, life
 
mad1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Angie Jolie lover from Belfast Norn Ireland. I LOVE YOU ANGIE! Im a Bono fan!
Posts: 13,153
Local Time: 08:35 PM
I agree that the parent should work with the child to help them understand these are peeps NOT to be afraid of, otherwise the kid is going to grow up ignorant.
__________________
mad1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 11:56 AM   #5
Blue Crack Addict
 
daygloeyes2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: No Emily's Allowed
Posts: 26,459
Local Time: 02:35 PM
I hope the kids of these parents don't grow up to be as ignorant as them.
__________________
daygloeyes2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 12:58 PM   #6
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 08:35 PM
I agree it's pathetic (and rather bizarre too) that any parent would think their child should be 'protected' from seeing disabled people.

I'd also point out though that what that American lobbyist said about small children reacting "not out of horror or disgust or fear" calls for matter-of-fact calmness on the parent's part when children have these reactions. I still remember one time when I was maybe 3, 4 years old and on a trip to the grocery store, staring fixedly at an elderly woman who was badly crippled up in a way I'd never seen before, wondering why she looked like that (I would never've marched up to her and asked though; I was a very shy and reserved kid). All of a sudden my mother came up behind me, grabbed my wrist hard and hissed, "Don't you EVER stare at people like that. NEVER stare." Scared me so much I jerked and almost yelled, obviously upset me a lot too or I wouldn't still remember it going on 35 years later. I do understand why she reacted that way; she was taking her own projected embarrassment on the woman's behalf and holding it against me, my staring being the cause of the presumed embarrassment. But that's not a good way to react either; if anything, it's only likely to give the child the impression that in fact there must be something shameful about such conditions, otherwise why would the parent freak out like that.
__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 02:00 PM   #7
Loungeroom Dancing Queen
 
Purplereign's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: where I can Breathe . . . and it's Magnificent
Posts: 24,782
Local Time: 05:35 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsSpringsteen View Post
“They acknowledge it, they don’t look away,” Otto said of small children. “They ask what happened, not out of horror or disgust or fear. The want to know what happened. A responsible adult tells them: ‘Here’s what the situation is.’”

Are adults the problem?
ditto

yep, adults are the problem - looking through their own lenses rather than that of their kids - what a bloody shame.
__________________
'You might just as well say, that "I breathe when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breathe"!'
Purplereign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 02:56 PM   #8
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
CTU2fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,366
Local Time: 03:35 PM
Adults are the problem.

Little kids ask me about my eye all the time. My left eye is a prosthesis, it's acrylic...the kids can't tell for sure that it's not real but they see something's amiss, and the smaller ones will ask. Generally the parents are horrified that the child has asked, but I don't mind at all. Kids are curious, they ask questions...of course then the follow-ups - can you see out of it, did it hurt, etc etc etc.
__________________
CTU2fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 03:07 PM   #9
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
Tiger Edge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: The Everglades
Posts: 4,740
Local Time: 03:35 PM
I work in a prosthetic office so none of this is bizarre to me. My mom has worked in one since I was born so I just grew up around it. Nothing fazes me. When I met a new friend a couple weeks back and told him I worked here he shivered and said that he couldn't stand to see the sight of someone without an arm. Another friend said he'd rather die than lose a finger (seriously?) because he wouldn't be able to stand the sight of his hand.
Most of the people that come to the office enter in wheelchair and leave the office running, or able to drive a car with their prosthetic arm. We have several clients that are missing multiple limbs, too. It's bizarre to think that some people think that there's something wrong with having a fake arm or leg, or none at all if you can't afford/wear one and that they should be away from public view.

This isn't the first time I've heard about this story, so I assume those who think there is something wrong with the host now realize that there is something wrong with them with all this justified backlash.

Actually, today we were discussing how to get child amputees excited about their prosthetics and I came across a bunch of photos of animals with prosthetics.
__________________
Tiger Edge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 04:19 PM   #10
Refugee
 
AliEnvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,320
Local Time: 07:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCOSTER View Post
Its sad that parents are complaining and not explaining.


About a great many things really. This story has its own are you fucking kidding me niche of its own though.
__________________
AliEnvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 04:31 PM   #11
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 02:35 PM
The ignorance on the parents part is quite overwhelming considering anyone of their children could have been disabled too.
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 07:39 PM   #12
Refugee
 
AliEnvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,320
Local Time: 07:35 PM
So this week Americans are afraid of kids with kiddie guns and Brits are afraid that their kids might be afraid of unarmed grown ups.




__________________
AliEnvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2009, 03:26 AM   #13
War Child
 
ShipOfFools's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 814
Local Time: 03:35 PM
^^

What scares me is that people are actually getting this uptight over something that the host can't control. Aren't parents supposed to teach their kids about love and respect? Where's the respect here, when they're trying to ban someone who's disabled? I wonder if they'd feel the same way, if their child was disabled and getting the same treatment.
__________________
ShipOfFools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2009, 09:52 PM   #14
New Yorker
 
MooMoo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: MUTANT SPIDER THING. D=<
Posts: 3,090
Local Time: 08:35 PM
The unknown leads to fear a lot of the time. I agree with peoples sentiments that the kids need to be told about these things.

Disabilities happen, it could happen to us all. I think a lot of mental disabilities need to be taught to kids, to explain how it works and what the person feels. Because, though Im not proud of it by any means, I am somewhat wary of the mentally ill, because I have little understanding of it. I dont know how to talk to or approach an autistic person for example.

Which, quite frankly, isnt right. There was a disabled section in both of my schools, and we were NEVER educated about these kids, so we would have more of a chance of interacting with them.

There was, what I assume to have been a mentally disabled girl in our sports class. And apart from the fact she was very shy and unsure of herself, she actually seemed perfectly fine otherwise. But hardly anyone would speak to her, and if they did, it was in a very condescending way.

I dont want to stay away from these people, I dont want to be scared of these people. I want to know about their illness or ailment and understand it. WHY wont schools teach about it? Introducing someone as a "special kid" and forcing them into a class DOES NOT = understanding.
__________________
MooMoo! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2009, 11:34 AM   #15
The Fly
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 62
Local Time: 02:35 PM
Oy, vey. It's just a missing arm, people. She doesn't walk around with a machine gun strapped to it, or anything. Really, aren't there worse things in the world for your kids to not see, like some random pervert walking around with his dangly boy bits hanging out? These people are idiots.

I can barely remember any reaction at all to people who didn't look 'normal' in my neighborhood. Because, to me, they /were/ normal.
__________________

__________________
Dirty Olde Town is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com