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Old 09-14-2010, 08:56 PM   #1
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Did She Ask For It?

You probably heard of Ines Sainz, the sports reporter who claims sexual harassment from the NY Jets. Here's part of an article discussing whether she was asking for it:

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Sainz, 32, a married mother of three, has nine years' experience as an on-air sports reporter. The controversy came after she covered the New York Jets game for Mexico's Aztec TV. First, during practice on Sunday, the players gently lobbed passes in her direction on the sidelines to get a better look at her assets. Then, when she entered the locker room to interview quarterback Mark Sanchez the next day, the situation grew more tense. Tense enough that Sainz opted not to return, reporting only from the sidelines last night.

While Sanchez himself was "a gentleman," says Sainz, one of the players was naked, a few allegedly catcalled her, yelling, "I want to play with a Mexican," while another Jet remarked on her looks in Spanish.

In the moment, Sainz decided to ignore the behavior, later tweeting that she was "dying of embarrassment" at the time. In fact, it was another female reporter who first approached her and asked whether the situation was making her uncomfortable, Sainz said on the "Today" show this morning. Otherwise, she never would have even reported the incident.

============================================================================================
What was the attire provoking the attacks? First, on the sidelines, it was a pair of tight jeans and a white button-down, which, with its V-neck, revealed Sainz' cleavage.

Then it was the quintessential little black dress: "Sexy TV reporter Ines Sainz slinked into last night's Jet game in a black minidress with a plunging neckline," crowed the New York Post. Only when was the last time you heard of any male reporter slinking anywhere? In fact, have we ever discussed so much as the color of one of their ties?

When Sainz appeared on "Today" this morning to defend herself, the chatter over her short skirt and peek-a-boo blouse -- and not the harassment, or whether it prevented her from doing her job -- swelled to a deafening roar in the blogosphere.

"Why don't they give the women reporters a sensitivity course on how to dress professionally ... her blouse, which exposed her breasts a little too much, belonged on MTV, not on a morning news show," carped a commenter on Babble.

A commenter on The Early Lead blog on the Washington Post went so far as to declare that Sainz gives professional women reporters a bad name. She wasn't deserving of an apology, wrote jj1968, based on her wardrobe alone.
http://www.lemondrop.com/2010/09/14/...c1_lnk3|170626

While I do think Sainz should not have been in the locker room, I am fuming over people saying she deserved to be harassed because she was scantily clad. I think its unfair because that's saying its the woman's fault when she is sexually harassed, assaulted, etc., because she revealed too much skin.

But at the same time, I find myself wondering when is it a good moment for a woman to express her sexuality? Each time she shows skin, even in an innocent moment, she's deemed a whore and asking for trouble. Why can't women be sexual? Why is it still a man's world? Is the belief that men are more hormonal than women a myth or a reality? Is it possible for men and women to coexist together when both are sexual beings, looking to express their sexuality?

Discuss...
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Old 09-14-2010, 08:59 PM   #2
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The big thing I was told in my Sports Broadcasting course was, as a woman, NOT to wear that kind of clothing. That it's hard enough to do that job as a woman, and to wear that kind of clothing is just making the situation worse.

Does that mean she was "asking for it"? Depends on if she was given the same speech.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:02 PM   #3
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Oh, my god, I was reading about this today. RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGE.

Yes, let's put the focus on her. Please justify why you didn't provoke the harrassment yourself. And in doing so, let's give those guys an excuse for their behavior.

Because men are just uncontrollable loons around a woman who might be dressed in tight clothes. Everyone knows that!

I can't discuss whether or not she was dressed "professionally" - but that's not even really the issue here. All of this discussion is just another way to try and blame the woman for being harrassed.

Awesome.

*leaves to go vomit in rage*
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:04 PM   #4
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The big thing I was told in my Sports Broadcasting course was, as a woman, NOT to wear that kind of clothing. That it's hard enough to do that job as a woman, and to wear that kind of clothing is just making the situation worse.
This kind of thing pisses me off, too, that these conversations are the norm. Let's place the responsibility on the woman - hey, you have to dress this way or else you'll get harrassed.

Rather than leaving it to the players to not act like assholes.

I'm sure there's a discussion to be had about dressing "professionally," and what that entails in the journalism field for women, but UGH.

Yet again - laying it on the woman to try and avoid being harrassed. Or laying it on the woman to avoid rape.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:04 PM   #5
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All I was saying, Cori, is that if she was briefed on what is considered professional attire in that situation, she was in the wrong, but men should know how to behave themselves, and it's quite unfortunate that they don't.

Unless you weren't directing that at me in which case, please let me get out of the way of your vomit.

Edit: oh there's the post directed at me.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:04 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
But at the same time, I find myself wondering when is it a good moment for a woman to express her sexuality? Each time she shows skin, even in an innocent moment, she's deemed a whore and asking for trouble. Why can't women be sexual? Why is it still a man's world? Is the belief that men are more hormonal than women a myth or a reality? Is it possible for men and women to coexist together when both are sexual beings, looking to express their sexuality?
People often have dress codes in their respective professions.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:04 PM   #7
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I don't think she asked for it.

It's a free country.


But, with so many Americans out of work, why are we bringing in reporters from Mexico?
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:06 PM   #8
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But, with so many Americans out of work, why are we bringing in reporters from Mexico?
In general, it's obnoxious when you do this. But this time, it's just stupid. She was reporting for Mexican tv.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:07 PM   #9
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All I was saying, Cori, is that if she was briefed on what is considered professional attire in that situation, she was in the wrong, but men should know how to behave themselves, and it's quite unfortunate that they don't. Edit: oh there's the post directed at me.
Yes. Sorry 'bout that.

The subject in general (victim-blaming/rape culture) gets me all het up .... in case you couldn't tell.

I'd say if it's a question of professionalism, then that's a discussion her boss or the network, or whoever, needs to have with her. Not have it being asked of her by, and debated in the media.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:08 PM   #10
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People often have dress codes in their respective professions.
True, but I should've said even in non-professional moments, like a night out. Even then women who expose a lot of skin are called sluts and are asking for trouble.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:09 PM   #11
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But that's not at work, Pearl. She was at work
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:10 PM   #12
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I know. But like Cori, I get upset when women are blamed for sexual harassment or even rape. This case reminded me of it.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:14 PM   #13
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The football players should be responsible for their behavior. (period)

These guys are getting in trouble all the time for behavior problems.

Playing pro ball is a privilege.


She is dressed no different then how many fans dress.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:17 PM   #14
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I know. But like Cori, I get upset when women are blamed for sexual harassment or even rape. This case reminded me of it.
Agreed, I'm just giving some insight into what I was told on the few times I worked with sports.

The fact is that she shouldn't have been treated like that. In spite of the fact that she shouldn't have dressed like that.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:18 PM   #15
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While I do think Sainz should not have been in the locker room
Why?
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