Darfur crisis on Google Earth - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-30-2007, 05:50 PM   #16
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,272
Local Time: 12:16 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by starsgoblue

As long as everybody has that sort of fatalist attitude then yes.
It's not a fatalist attitude, it is a realistic assessment of fact backed up by hundreds of years of precedent.

It's not economically desirable to actually help these people - and imposing half-assed sanctions or establishing international criminal tribunals 20 years later is neither helpful nor provides justice. It's just something we do to make ourselves be able to sleep at night. Not like it's doing anything constructive for the people on the ground, today.
__________________

__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2007, 01:17 PM   #17
Blue Crack Addict
 
MrsSpringsteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 24,974
Local Time: 12:16 AM
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationwo...ck=1&cset=true

Quote:
Sudan has secretly worked with the CIA to spy on the insurgency in Iraq, an example of how the U.S. has continued to cooperate with the Sudanese regime even while condemning its suspected role in the killing of tens of thousands of civilians in Darfur.

President Bush has denounced the killings in Sudan's western region as genocide and has imposed sanctions on the government in Khartoum. But some critics say the administration has soft-pedaled the sanctions to preserve its extensive intelligence collaboration with Sudan.
__________________

__________________
MrsSpringsteen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2007, 01:40 PM   #18
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 12:16 AM
Bush
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 08:44 AM   #19
Babyface
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 16
Local Time: 05:16 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by diamond


How come this wasn't covered in the Press:
Bush tightens sanctions on Sudan over Darfur

Oh snap! because Bush was trying to do a good thing.
Im not sure sanctions is the solution here - the Darfur conflict is much more complicated than punishing the state.

The US has two crude modes in foreign policy: all out war and sanctions. What is needed in East Africa and the Middle East is "peacebuilding" - negotiations, compromise, talking.

Look at Isreal/Palestine: where is the peacebuilding? THere is none - all there is is selling of arms, sancitons, ignoring democratic votes and, on the periphary, all out war.

Making peace requires diplomacy and effort: absolutely none forthcoming from the US at this time. And it is down to the US to do this: the administration continually weakens the UN (who should be doing this), so if the US wants all the power for itself it is the US's responsibility to use it wisely.

Sanctions deepen poverty and create resentment.
__________________
Joshua T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 09:16 AM   #20
Blue Crack Addict
 
verte76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: hoping for changes
Posts: 23,331
Local Time: 05:16 AM
I just did a donation to Darfur by way of Mercy Corps. Come on, let's donate! It's the least we can do.
__________________
verte76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 09:55 AM   #21
Babyface
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 16
Local Time: 05:16 AM
Good one verte76.

Theres also the INstant Karma project of which almost every penny will be reaching Darfur - looks like being a great album all round (aside from the U2 track which goes without question!).

I've heard something along the lines that Amnesty did a deal with Itunes so that Itunes will be giving over all their cut (usually quite sizeable) to the charity.

Charity is all well and good to help the people in desperate need on the ground - but as I was saying, what we really need is a UN peacemaking effort, backed by the US.

As Mrs Sprinsteen's post above shows, there is always a hidden political agenda stopping real progress.
__________________
Joshua T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 12:43 PM   #22
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
maycocksean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Most Important State in the Union
Posts: 4,882
Local Time: 12:16 AM
Sadly, I can't think of any time in history where the world has intervened to stop an ongoing genocide. When the intervention comes it's for other reasons, with the genocide being halted being a convenient side-benefit.

Even the U.S. entry in World War II was not to stop the Holocaust.

I do want to do something to help though, personally. It just seems so wrong that people could be suffering like this even as I sit here typing away at my computer.
__________________
maycocksean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 04:03 PM   #23
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 12:16 AM
^http://www.savedarfur.org/content?splash=yes

There is plenty you can do and not even spend any $.
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 06:37 PM   #24
Rock n' Roll Doggie
Band-aid
 
maycocksean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Most Important State in the Union
Posts: 4,882
Local Time: 12:16 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by JCOSTER
^http://www.savedarfur.org/content?splash=yes

There is plenty you can do and not even spend any $.
Thanks for the link!
__________________
maycocksean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 07:06 PM   #25
Acrobat
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 316
Local Time: 05:16 AM
Thank-you for the link, JCOSTER.

Other things we can do for those kids who have made it out of Sudan (if you have the time), is tutor them...

In Melbourne we have an organisation named SAIL.

http://home. vicnet.net.au/~sail/insudan.htm

I know we're not helping the crisis itself but at least we can actively help the kids who have lived through the crisis. Their struggles continue over here... arriving in a strange new country, being overwhelmed at school, struggling to learn English... separated from their families, witnessed torture or genocide... we can offer them support... and the opportunity to do as well as they can in their new country.

Not sure if there are organisations like this in the US or Britain but its worth looking into if you have the time... it only takes a morning of a weekend.

Melbournians can also check this out:

Darfur Australia Network Short Film & Silent Auction Evening
Loop Bar, 23 Meyers Place, Melbourne
Thursday 21st June, 6pm – 8pm

http://www. darfuraustralia.org/events/upcomingevents
__________________
AchtungGirl219 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 07:13 PM   #26
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 12:16 AM
Thanks I will look it to see if they're in my area!
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 07:49 PM   #27
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 06:16 AM
There are several networks of that sort here in the US; two which our synagogue has worked with are the International Rescue Committee (note this page has links to their various regional offices in both Europe and the US) and Interfaith Refugee and Immigration Ministries, which is based in Chicago. Or more simply, start by checking the Yellow Pages for your area using Human Services Organizations as keywords. I'm not personally aware of any one umbrella organization which coordinates volunteers across the entire country for this cause, though there may be one; refugee communities are often much more widely scattered across the country than you might think--for instance, here in Indiana the city of Fort Wayne happens to be home to several hundred Darfur refugees, as well as thousands of refugees from scores of other countries as well. So there are many smaller cities and towns across the country which are very much in need of this type of volunteer; it's not just major metropolitan areas.
__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2007, 06:30 PM   #28
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 06:16 AM
There's a petition over at Save Darfur's site, deploring the failure of last year's Resolution 1706 and imploring Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to make swift fulfillment of this one his highest priority, if anyone wishes to sign it.

Quote:
Sudan agrees to 26,000 UN troops in Darfur

The Security Council resolution, passed unanimously on Tuesday, would have boots on the ground by the end of the year.

By Tom A. Peter
Christian Science Monitor, August 2, 2007


The Darfur conflict may be coming closer to an end following the United Nations Security Council's unanimous decision on Tuesday to deploy a 26,000-strong peacekeeping force to Sudan's troubled region. The four-year-old conflict, referred to as a genocide by the US, has caused more than 200,000 deaths and dislocated more than 2.5 million people. The UN resolution managed to win the support of the traditionally resistant Sudanese and Chinese governments, but some observers say there's still room for it to fail.

The force will be largely composed of Africans and will consist of nearly 20,000 military personnel and 6,000 police officers. Known as the UN African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID), the force is expected to select its commanders by October and take over operations from the 7000 African Union (AU) peacekeepers currently in Sudan by the end of the year, reports the UN News Service. For the first 12 months, UN forces will incorporate the AU troops into their mission. UNAMID is tasked with acting under Chapter VII of the UN Charter to support the "early and effective implementation" of last year's Darfur Peace Agreement between the Government and the rebels, and it is also mandated to protect civilians, prevent armed attacks and ensure the security of aid workers and its own personnel and facilities.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called the mission "historic and unprecedented." It will come after months of Sudanese resistance and will cost about $2 billion in its first year, reports the New York Times. "You are sending a clear and powerful signal of your commitment to improve the lives of the people of the region and close this tragic chapter in Sudan's history," [Mr. Ban] told the Security Council.

China, too, posed a hurdle to passing the Darfur resolution. One of the Sudan's strongest political supporters and the No. 1 consumer of its oil, China had objected to prior attempts to sanction Sudan or send peacekeeping forces there. However, "British officials said that China's oil interests in Sudan were eventually outweighed by anxiety about a possible international human-rights backlash over Darfur aimed at next year's Olympic Games in Beijing," reports the Guardian.

Since agreeing to support the UNAMID mission, Chinese Ambassador Wang Guangya described a peace agreement as a "fundamental prerequisite" for lasting stability in Darfur. Mr. Guangya also emphasized the importance of addressing Sudan's lack of development, which many see as the root of Darfur's problems. He said it is critical to the peace process, reports China's Xinhua News Agency. "The international community should take a long-term perspective, work out at an early date a development strategy for Darfur in consultation with the government of Sudan, and provide more input to economic and social development in Darfur, so as to fundamentally improve the livelihood of the people and uproot the source of conflicts," the ambassador added.

Although the resolution does not mention sanctions in the event of Sudan's non-compliance, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown threatened to impose them if the killing continues. The Independent reports that Mr. Brown sent a "blunt warning" to the Sudanese government, which up until April had repeatedly denied international troops access to Darfur, not to interfere with UN forces. "We must be clear: if any party blocks progress and the killings continue, I and others will redouble our efforts to impose further sanctions," he said. "I am not prepared to let this tragedy continue without action."

Ban says the mission will "make a clear and positive difference," despite numerous concessions that had to be made to bring Sudan to the table. In addition to removing the threat of sanctions from the Security Council resolution, other areas were scaled back as well. UNAMID forces cannot seize and dispose of illegal weapons, for example; they can only monitor them, reports Reuters. After participating in negotiations, Sudanese officials have agreed to cooperate with the resolution. "[The resolution] is practical. It's taken into consideration most of our concerns – we are comfortable with the resolution," Sudanese Foreign Minister Lam Akol told Reuters. "We can live with it," he said, adding the government had no problems with the timetable of deployment, which is expected to take up to a year to get the entire force in place. "Now that we have been part of the discussion we will definitely cooperate with it."

While many have expressed hope that UNAMID forces may spell the end of Darfur's troubles, longtime observers caution that concrete action must follow. British Ambassador Emyr Jones Parry noted that the Khartoum government and rebels have broken agreements with the UN Security Council before, and this latest resolution is only the first step, reports the Los Angeles Times. "The catastrophe of Darfur will not be ended by the raising of 15 hands in this chamber. The suffering will not be ended by our vote," he said. "But today's decision and the actions that flow from it offer the prospect of a new start for Darfur. That is our hope. That is our goal."
__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2007, 10:15 PM   #29
ONE
love, blood, life
 
JCOSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: It's a very, very mad world.
Posts: 14,971
Local Time: 12:16 AM
I've been doing everything Save Darfurs email me with. I hope it will change their soon. I just put Darfur on my prayer list at church.

I've also been reading the book by Don Cheadle not on our watch which is really good and explains the current situation in greater detail.
__________________
JCOSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 04:20 PM   #30
Forum Moderator
 
yolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,471
Local Time: 06:16 AM
Quote:
Can world's 'Elders' help solve Darfur?

Desmond Tutu, Jimmy Carter, and other respected international leaders join forces to push for peace in Sudan.


By Scott Baldauf and Rob Crilly
Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 3


Johannesburg, South Africa; AND En Siro, Sudan -- In Sudan, where African Union mediators, Hollywood stars, and even the pope have failed to secure a lasting peace, South Africa's retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his group of retired statesmen, The Elders, are stepping in. It is the first of what will be many peace missions by the new group, which includes Nobel laureates former South African President Nelson Mandela and former US president Jimmy Carter. On the current Sudan mission, Mr. Mandela's wife, Graça Machel; Mr. Carter; former UN envoy Lakhdar Brahimi; and Mr. Tutu are visiting both government and rebel leaders to discuss solutions to the conflict in Darfur.

Sending an elder statesman, with no political stake in the outcome, to seek a peaceful solution is a proven conflict-resolution tool. Retired Sen. George Mitchell, for example, was instrumental in bringing peace to Northern Ireland. And if one elder statesman has an edge, will a bevy of them ensure success?

It's too soon to say. But this group of elders comes armed with plenty of mediation experience. In 1995, Mandela played a key role in resolving the civil conflict in Burundi. In 1989, Carter managed to bring a pause in fighting between Eritrea and Ethiopia, although the peace deal has since fallen apart. Carter won his Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 for "untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts."

The group is wisely, analysts say, already tamping down expectations and indicating they're in it for the long haul. "I think this is more than just a victory lap," says Francis Kornegay, a senior political analyst at the Center for Policy Studies in Johannesburg. "It's probably part of a longer-running process of conflict resolution and mediation. It's an effort to get as much international diplomatic and political leverage on the situation as possible."

The Elders' visit comes three weeks before fresh UN-sponsored Darfur peace talks in Libya, and observers hope the group's global status and negotiating experience will give the process a much-needed boost. "There is no doubt that the role of elders has always been a part of African politics, and not just in Africa; it's a global phenomenon," says David Monyae, a history professor at Witswatersrand University in Johannesburg. "They bring a continuity and experience and a credibility that, especially in a conflict-torn country, would be of good use and quite welcome."

In the past, Africans have tended to respect elders, but for decades now it's the young men who have been fighting, and for whom guns, not experience, are the means of power. The question now is whether elder statesmen such as Tutu, Mandela, Carter, and others can gain traction in a conflict that has resisted efforts from Chinese, European, and Arab mediators thus far. The Elders already have one victory of sorts, a promise by the Sudanese government in Khartoum to pay $300 million in compensation ($200 million of it from China) to help rebuild Darfur after the war. And Carter said President Omar al-Bashir was also willing to have international observers at planned elections in 2009.

Yet, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, speaking to reporters on arrival in Khartoum, said he realized that lasting peace would not come easily. "The Elders do not want to raise anyone's hopes during this visit," he said.

Some African experts argue that some conflicts just don't yield to mediation, no matter how gray the hair of the mediator. "Look, there are a lot of myths about Africa and the role of elders, but the fact is that when you talk about Africa, it is a tremendously diverse place, with a myriad of cultures," says Steven Friedman, a senior researcher at the Institute for Democracy in South Africa, in Johannesburg. "It is not one culture or tradition throughout..It's not that international players aren't taken seriously here," adds Mr. Friedman. "But there are plenty of people [in Sudan] who are concerned about looking good in the eyes of the international community, and they pull the wool over the public eyes. To get a slice of power, people can be adept at portraying themselves as lovers of freedom."

In any event, some combatants in Sudan's Darfur region don't seem interested in conflict resolution just yet, Mr. Friedman adds, a fact made clear by the recent attack by Darfur rebels that killed 10 peacekeepers of the African Union last week. The latest violent attacks threaten to undermine the presence of foreign peacekeepers – and the activities of international aid groups.

Just a few days after the attack on African Union peacekeeping troops, reportedly carried out by a branch of the Sudan Liberation Army rebel group, rebel leaders now say that they expect more such attacks on the AU, because of their inability or unwillingness to do their job, which is keeping the peace. Rebels blame the 7,000 member African Union force (mostly from Nigeria) for a flawed peace deal signed last year by the government and one rebel faction, which was brokered by the AU. Commander Ibrahim Abdullah Al "Hello," who controls the northern Darfur town of En Siro for one branch of the Sudan Liberation Army, says he does not know who was responsible for the attack on AU troops in Haskanita. But he says that the numerous rebel factions are united in their hatred of the AU force. "All the soldiers of the rebel movement are ashamed now to co-operate with the African Union," he says. "The AU came to look after the cease-fire and report to the international community but they have been unable to stop the big incidents carried out by the government and the janjaweed." Not only are they failing to do their job, he says, but there is a suspicion that they are too close to Khartoum. "It seems very easy for the government to push the AU around and that makes us view them as the enemy," he says.

Previous attacks on AU forces have involved carjackings, which is one way the rebels obtain vehicles.

Such is the animosity for the AU that most aid agencies refuse to allow the officers on to their premises for fear of attracting rebel hostility.
__________________

__________________
yolland [at] interference.com


μελετώ αποτυγχάνειν. -- Διογένης της Σινώπης
yolland is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
africa, darfur

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com