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Old 05-20-2010, 10:19 PM   #1
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Chinglish!

ah the croeleing of english and chinese in south east asia. especially the folks of chinese origin in singapore and malaysia!

personally think people who speak chinglish to be some of the coolest people in the world theres none of the constraints that come with being chinese in mainland china, i find the folks from mainland china to be too different, to give an example, how do african americans find the folks from africa?

i have to speak a little bit of chinese because of my mum. but i know what it takes to be chinglish.
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Old 05-20-2010, 10:36 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by CrashedCarDriver View Post
ah the croeleing of english and chinese in south east asia. especially the folks of chinese origin in singapore and malaysia!

personally think people who speak chinglish to be some of the coolest people in the world theres none of the constraints that come with being chinese in mainland china, i find the folks from mainland china to be too different, to give an example, how do african americans find the folks from africa?

i have to speak a little bit of chinese because of my mum. but i know what it takes to be chinglish.
Ah, Chinglish. . .I remember hearing about it when I visited Singapore a few years ago.

I'm African American (I guess) but I've been living overseas for much of my adult life and I haven't had much exposure to Africans. Although, I'm now teaching in a predominantly black school with a large African population. But I don't really "find" them any particular way. The biggest difference that immediately springs to mind is their appearance more than anything.
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Old 05-22-2010, 12:19 AM   #3
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Is Chinglish what they occasionally used in Firefly the TV show?
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Old 05-23-2010, 01:02 AM   #4
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Is Chinglish what they occasionally used in Firefly the TV show?
Mentioning Firefly grants so much respect
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Old 05-26-2010, 05:53 AM   #5
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i have to speak a little bit of chinese because of my mum. but i know what it takes to be chinglish.
I see it's been a few days since you made this post, but if you're still following, I'd love to hear a little more about the cultural distinction you're making there, and what it means to you.



In the US, the term 'Chinglish' doesn't really convey the same range of meaning(s) you're attaching to it here. Sometimes, you'll hear Chinese-Americans use it to refer to the mix of Chinese (usually Cantonese) and English their family perhaps speaks at home; but just as often, it's used by Americans of any background to refer to what we (stereotypically) perceive as "kinds of mistakes Chinese people who can't speak much English make when they attempt to." Most Americans would never have heard of the English-based creoles spoken in Singapore and Malaysia, and those who have generally call them 'Singlish' and/or 'Manglish'--I think most Americans would hesitate to call them 'Chinglish,' since that word is perhaps somewhat tainted in our culture by its potential associations with pejorative, 'laughing-at-rather-than-with' associations. But, it could also be the case that there are pockets of Singlish/Manglish speakers in some Chinese-American communities out there who do use the term 'Chinglish' to describe their 'creoling,' and I'm simply unaware of it.

I'm a white/Euro-American currently winding up a year working and teaching at a Hong Kong university, with frequent visits to the mainland on related business. Unfortunately, like most white people here in HK, I can't speak either Cantonese nor Mandarin worth a damn, lol; so I'm afraid I have relatively little of insight to contribute concerning the culture and politics of multilingualism here in HK. I teach in English, of course, but my students have been roughly a 50/50 mix of mainlanders and 'HK people' (i.e., HK ethnic Cantonese)--that's a considerable overrepresentation of mainlanders, relative to how many of them are actually enrolled at our university overall, but in general, we find our mainland students more keen on signing up for the small number of courses in English we offer, since they're more driven to really work on their English. (To be fair, as you'd expect, our HK students do tend to have better English heading into college to begin with, though they're by no means reliably highly fluent: while English technically remains an official language here, just as it does in Singapore, it isn't at all the full-fledged lingua franca it is there, where the majority can speak it with ease regardless of what else they speak at home...instead, Hong Kong lives, moves and breathes in Cantonese, so if you don't want to live in a bubble here, you'd better learn it, otherwise your social circle will be limited to some fairly elite connections.)
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Although, I'm now teaching in a predominantly black school with a large African population.
Interesting! I didn't know that about your current community. Back in Indiana I've had increasing numbers of Somali immigrant students in recent years, typically from 'rust belt' areas in the north of the state...there seem to be quite a lot of Somali communities, at least, putting down roots in that extended region.
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Old 05-26-2010, 07:00 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by yolland View Post
I see it's been a few days since you made this post, but if you're still following, I'd love to hear a little more about the cultural distinction you're making there, and what it means to you.



In the US, the term 'Chinglish' doesn't really convey the same range of meaning(s) you're attaching to it here. Sometimes, you'll hear Chinese-Americans use it to refer to the mix of Chinese (usually Cantonese) and English their family perhaps speaks at home; but just as often, it's used by Americans of any background to refer to what we (stereotypically) perceive as "kinds of mistakes Chinese people who can't speak much English make when they attempt to." Most Americans would never have heard of the English-based creoles spoken in Singapore and Malaysia, and those who have generally call them 'Singlish' and/or 'Manglish'--I think most Americans would hesitate to call them 'Chinglish,' since that word is perhaps somewhat tainted in our culture by its potential associations with pejorative, 'laughing-at-rather-than-with' associations. But, it could also be the case that there are pockets of Singlish/Manglish speakers in some Chinese-American communities out there who do use the term 'Chinglish' to describe their 'creoling,' and I'm simply unaware of it.

I'm a white/Euro-American currently winding up a year working and teaching at a Hong Kong university, with frequent visits to the mainland on related business. Unfortunately, like most white people here in HK, I can't speak either Cantonese nor Mandarin worth a damn, lol; so I'm afraid I have relatively little of insight to contribute concerning the culture and politics of multilingualism here in HK. I teach in English, of course, but my students have been roughly a 50/50 mix of mainlanders and 'HK people' (i.e., HK ethnic Cantonese)--that's a considerable overrepresentation of mainlanders, relative to how many of them are actually enrolled at our university overall, but in general, we find our mainland students more keen on signing up for the small number of courses in English we offer, since they're more driven to really work on their English. (To be fair, as you'd expect, our HK students do tend to have better English heading into college to begin with, though they're by no means reliably highly fluent: while English technically remains an official language here, just as it does in Singapore, it isn't at all the full-fledged lingua franca it is there, where the majority can speak it with ease regardless of what else they speak at home...instead, Hong Kong lives, moves and breathes in Cantonese, so if you don't want to live in a bubble here, you'd better learn it, otherwise your social circle will be limited to some fairly elite connections.)
there is a bit of beef between the chinese that live on the mainland and the chinese of the rest of the world. possibly because of how westernised life is in parts of the world such as hk, taiwan and singapore. where china fell behind because of communist ideals. i have met a few chinese folk from china (somewhere other than shanghai) and i have to tell you they are fairly unpleasant to deal with in terms of lack of cultural refinement.

the people from the mainland retain old ideals and traditions and theres a lot of taboo for life for the mainlanders. whereas the ones that live elsewhere have taken up ideas of living and behaving in places where their grandparents/ parents immigrated to.

but no, singapore is the ultimate culprit in terms of mixing up languages in the same sentence. but for all the language jumping it remains understandable. However i am sure a singaporean can speak exclusively english to an american/ english or australian. although i am not sure about the level of chinese in an exclusively chinese speaking part of the world (that is my point of view). Also possibly from the overpowering influence of american tv and hollywood movies.

EDIT - the ones who have adapted to the adopted country even though they dont behave like the chinese of the mainland the ideals have transformed and have merged that competitive drive with the westernised rat race ideals. there is a stronger emphasis of workmanship quality not quantity, and the people are far more demanding of performing to a level of standards. and people

the ones who have moved to america or wherever are unlikely to marry someone from china (first generation) because of the cultural gulf. which is where there are so many cross cultural relations. but the relationship is seemless as the chinese person not only walks and talks like a western person. there is also a physical difference in terms of the different diets. which in my case, i have an imposing physique from working out in the gym and participating in physical activities whereas the chinese can only be skinny or fat completely dependant on how much food they eat.
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Old 05-26-2010, 05:53 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by CrashedCarDriver View Post
ah the croeleing of english and chinese in south east asia. especially the folks of chinese origin in singapore and malaysia!

personally think people who speak chinglish to be some of the coolest people in the world theres none of the constraints that come with being chinese in mainland china, i find the folks from mainland china to be too different, to give an example, how do african americans find the folks from africa?

i have to speak a little bit of chinese because of my mum. but i know what it takes to be chinglish.
I know what you mean! Elderly Indonesians in the Netherlands also speak a cool mix between Malasian and Dutch. My mom and my aunts sometimes speak it, but I can't; my mum always says it's a dying language.
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