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Old 06-22-2007, 11:00 PM   #166
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Quote:
Originally posted by fly so high!
Madison is heaps popular now.....i have met heaps of "Maddy's"
I've met heaps of Maddies, but they've always been Madelines. I never would have expected Madison to become popular as a first name, especially not as a female name. It sounds more masculine to me. But perhaps that's just because when I think of Madison, I think of males like James Madison.

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we have a next door neighbour that has recently moved in that has a 3 year old called "BJ"...that's it "BJ" it apparently is not short for anything..... the mum just liked the sound of BJ! I hate when parents try to be "different"
Now that just makes me wonder if the mother's a bit obsessed with BJ Hunnicut from M*A*S*H!
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Old 06-23-2007, 01:02 AM   #167
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Originally posted by MaxFisher
This makes me think of the Seinfeld episode where George likes the name "Seven" for a kid.
LMAO I love that episode.
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Old 06-23-2007, 01:06 AM   #168
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I have a friend named Allender, (pronounced like Calendar without the C) which is a family name. It was her great-grandmother's surname. Her middle name is Penn, after another surname of her family. Her brother is Lucian, which is not so uncommon, but they are both unique, I think. The owner of a cafe where I live is named Sparrow.


Ooh and there was a wealthy family in Texas who had a daughter named Ima. The pity is, her last name was Hogg.
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Old 06-23-2007, 06:30 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axver


Now that just makes me wonder if the mother's a bit obsessed with BJ Hunnicut from M*A*S*H!
I thought about the same. His brother might get the name Hawkeye, or BF.

In former East Germany it was very popular to call kids names like Mandy, Peggy, Nancy, Jaqueline etc. or boys Kevin, Dennis etc.
Not that unusual for English speaking countries though, it's not really German names. I guess it was a form of protesting the regime.
Now you come across heaps of girls or boys with that name and immediately know where this person comes from.
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Old 06-23-2007, 07:43 AM   #170
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Ooh and there was a wealthy family in Texas who had a daughter named Ima. The pity is, her last name was Hogg. [/B][/QUOTE]

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Old 06-23-2007, 08:25 AM   #171
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since every third little girl we see in clinic is named Madison I looked it up on the name popularity charts and found that it's wildly popular everywhere in the US EXCEPT in Wisconsin. Go figure. From now on whenever I think of the name Madison I'll think of happy cows
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Old 06-23-2007, 08:58 AM   #172
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Re: oh my...

Quote:
Originally posted by Kiki



Why....why....WHY would you do that to that child?! lol
Because nobody puts Baby in a corner [/Dirty Dancing]
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Old 06-23-2007, 02:03 PM   #173
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http://uk.news.yahoo.com/pressass/20...n-6323e80.html
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Old 06-23-2007, 04:36 PM   #174
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never mind
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Old 06-23-2007, 04:37 PM   #175
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What is the deal with making Chase a first name? I don't mind it, I actually think it's neat sounding, but where did that come from?
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Old 06-23-2007, 04:39 PM   #176
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Quote:
Originally posted by phillyfan26
What is the deal with making Chase a first name? I don't mind it, I actually think it's neat sounding, but where did that come from?
I know somebody named Chase,it ait a weird name,I agree with you
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Old 06-23-2007, 09:47 PM   #177
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The 3 little girls that live next door to us are named Andromeda, Serenity, and Nevaeh (I love that last one actually; Heaven spelle backwards)
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Old 06-23-2007, 09:48 PM   #178
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I went to college with a girl named Unida Mann.
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Old 06-23-2007, 09:50 PM   #179
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also, not sure if I mentioned this already as this is an old thread. . .

I once had a student whose first name was Al Pacino.

This was on the small Pacific island of Chuuk where unusual first names were quite common. Other students at our school included Retina, Hamburger, Red Sea, V-3, and Vanilla Ice.
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Old 06-24-2007, 02:31 AM   #180
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^ In certain tribal regions of northeastern India, especially Meghalaya and Nagaland, it's quite common for parents to give their children names randomly drawn from history, popular culture or just in general "interesting"-sounding foreign words and phrases (often, but not necessarily, English ones)...everything from Ulysses to Toilet to Barrister to Boer War to Hilarious; the last time I was in India, I remember reading an article about the latest political initiative of a Meghalayan politican named Adolf Hitler Marak. There are a few tribes which specifically have a reputation for the custom of deliberately choosing 'humorous' names for one's children, but in most cases--and I'm guessing it's likely the same on Chuuk?--the parents likely held little or no associations with the word, phrase or name in its 'original' context. It's more a consequence of their traditional understanding of the 'proper' way to choose a name, which emphasizes above all that it must be completely unique; to discover that anyone else of your ethnic group happens to have the same name as you do would be mortifying, and naming a child after a long-deceased relative (or some word in the native language) is likewise almost unthinkable.

It's interesting how the traditional considerations involved in how one should choose a child's name vary so much across cultures and subcultures like that. We named our first child Akiva, which from a general Jewish POV is nothing particularly unusual for a boy--but, we're both from fairly traditional Sephardic families where the expectation is that you'll name all your children after fairly close relatives, and there's no known Akiva in either of our family trees, so all the grandparents were...not upset exactly, but they reacted somewhat the same way most grandparents today might to their grandchild being named 'Starlight' or something like that: um, well, it's nice I guess dear, pleasant associations and all that, but why would you turn to such "eccentric" word/name categories as a source for ideas?
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