arrest the Pope - U2 Feedback

Go Back   U2 Feedback > Lypton Village > Free Your Mind
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-26-2010, 01:29 PM   #1
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,494
Local Time: 06:08 AM
arrest the Pope

unbelievable.

Quote:
Memo to Pope Described Transfer of Pedophile Priest
By NICHOLAS KULISH and KATRIN BENNHOLD

MUNICH — The future Pope Benedict XVI was kept more closely apprised of a sexual abuse case in Germany than previous church statements have suggested, raising fresh questions about his handling of a scandal unfolding under his direct supervision before he rose to the top of the church’s hierarchy.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the future pope and archbishop in Munich at the time, was copied on a memo that informed him that a priest, whom he had approved sending to therapy in 1980 to overcome pedophilia, would be returned to pastoral work within days of beginning psychiatric treatment. The priest was later convicted of molesting boys in another parish.

An initial statement on the matter issued earlier this month by the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising placed full responsibility for the decision to allow the priest to resume his duties on Cardinal Ratzinger’s deputy, the Rev. Gerhard Gruber. But the memo, whose existence was confirmed by two church officials, shows that the future pope not only led a meeting on Jan. 15, 1980, approving the transfer of the priest, but was also kept informed about the priest’s reassignment.

What part he played in the decision making, and how much interest he showed in the case of the troubled priest, who had molested multiple boys in his previous job, remains unclear. But the personnel chief who handled the matter from the beginning, the Rev. Friedrich Fahr, “always remained personally, exceptionally connected” to Cardinal Ratzinger, the church said.

The case of the German priest, the Rev. Peter Hullermann, has acquired fresh relevance because it unfolded at a time when Cardinal Ratzinger, who was later put in charge of handling thousands of abuse cases on behalf of the Vatican, was in a position to refer the priest for prosecution, or at least to stop him from coming into contact with children. The German Archdiocese has acknowledged that “bad mistakes” were made in the handling of Father Hullermann, though it attributed those mistakes to people reporting to Cardinal Ratzinger rather than to the cardinal himself.

Church officials defend Benedict by saying the memo was routine and was “unlikely to have landed on the archbishop’s desk,” according to the Rev. Lorenz Wolf, judicial vicar at the Munich Archdiocese. But Father Wolf said he could not rule out that Cardinal Ratzinger had read it.

According to Father Wolf, who spoke with Father Gruber this week at the request of The New York Times, Father Gruber, the former vicar general, said that he could not remember a detailed conversation with Cardinal Ratzinger about Father Hullermann, but that Father Gruber refused to rule out that “the name had come up.”

Benedict is well known for handling priestly abuse cases in the Vatican before he became pope. While some have criticized his role in adjudicating such cases over the past two decades, he has also won praise from victims’ advocates for taking the issue more seriously, apologizing to American victims in 2008.

The future pope’s time in Munich, in the broader sweep of his life story, has until now been viewed mostly as a steppingstone on the road to the Vatican. But this period in his career has recently come under scrutiny — particularly six decisive weeks from December 1979 to February 1980.

In that short span, a review of letters, meeting minutes and documents from personnel files shows, Father Hullermann went from disgrace and suspension from his duties in Essen to working without restrictions as a priest in Munich, despite the fact that he was described in the letter requesting his transfer as a potential “danger.”

In September 1979, the chaplain was removed from his congregation after three sets of parents told his superior, the Rev. Norbert Essink, that he had molested their sons, charges he did not deny, according to notes taken by the superior and still in Father Hullermann’s personnel file in Essen.

On Dec. 20, 1979, Munich’s personnel chief, Father Fahr, received a phone call from his counterpart in the Essen Diocese, Klaus Malangré.

There is no official record of their conversation, but in a letter to Father Fahr dated that Jan. 3, Father Malangré referred to it as part of a formal request for Father Hullermann’s transfer to Munich to see a psychiatrist there.

Sexual abuse of boys is not explicitly mentioned in the letter, but the subtext is clear. “Reports from the congregation in which he was last active made us aware that Chaplain Hullermann presented a danger that caused us to immediately withdraw him from pastoral duties,” the letter said. By pointing out that “no proceedings against Chaplain Hullermann are pending,” Father Malangré also communicated that the danger in question was serious enough that it could have merited legal consequences.

He dropped another clear hint by suggesting that Father Hullermann could teach religion “at a girls’ school.”

On Jan. 9, Father Fahr prepared a summary of the situation for top officials at the diocese, before their weekly meeting, saying that a young chaplain needed “medical-psychotherapeutic treatment in Munich” and a place to live with “an understanding colleague.” Beyond that, it presented the priest from Essen in almost glowing terms, as a “very talented man, who could be used in a variety of ways.”

Father Fahr’s role in the case has thus far received little attention, in contrast to Father Gruber’s mea culpa.

Father Wolf, who is acting as the internal legal adviser on the Hullermann case, said in an interview this week that Father Fahr was “the filter” of all information concerning Father Hullermann. He was also, according to his obituary on the archdiocese Web site, a close friend of Cardinal Ratzinger.

A key moment came on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1980. Cardinal Ratzinger presided that morning over the meeting of the diocesan council. His auxiliary bishops and department heads gathered in a conference room on the top floor of the bishop’s administrative offices, housed in a former monastery on a narrow lane in downtown Munich.

It was a busy day, with the deaths of five priests, the acquisition of a piece of art and pastoral care in Vietnamese for recent immigrants among the issues sharing the agenda with item 5d, the delicate matter of Father Hullermann’s future.

The minutes of the meeting include no references to the actual discussion that day, simply stating that a priest from Essen in need of psychiatric treatment required room and board in a Munich congregation. “The request is granted,” read the minutes, stipulating that Father Hullermann would live at St. John the Baptist Church in the northern part of the city.

Church officials have their own special name for the language in meeting minutes, which are internal but circulate among secretaries and other diocese staff members, said Father Wolf, who has a digitized archive of meeting minutes, including those for the Jan. 15 meeting. “It’s protocol-speak,” he said. “Those who know what it’s about understand, and those who don’t, don’t.”

Five days later, on Jan. 20, Cardinal Ratzinger’s office received a copy of the memo from his vicar general, Father Gruber, returning Father Hullermann to full duties, a spokesman for the archdiocese confirmed.

Father Hullermann resumed parish work practically on arrival in Munich, on Feb. 1, 1980. He was convicted in 1986 of molesting boys at another Bavarian parish.

This week, new accusations of sexual abuse emerged, both from his first assignment in a parish near Essen, in northern Germany, and from 1998 in the southern German town of Garching an der Alz.

Father Fahr died two years ago. A spokesman for the diocese in Essen said that Father Malangré was not available for an interview. Father Malangré, now 88, recently had an accident and was confused and unreliable as a witness when questioned in an internal inquiry into the handling of Father Hullermann’s case, said the spokesman, Ulrich Lota.

Father Gruber, who took responsibility for the decision to put Father Hullermann back into a parish, was not present at the Jan. 15 meeting, according to Father Wolf, and has not answered repeated interview requests.




the man failed to report a horrific crime. he aided and abetted child abuse. lock him up.
__________________

__________________
Irvine511 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 01:38 PM   #2
Blue Crack Distributor
 
corianderstem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 63,730
Local Time: 03:08 AM
What do you even say about this? It's so shameful, disgusting and appalling.
__________________

__________________
corianderstem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 01:43 PM   #3
War Child
 
ShipOfFools's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 814
Local Time: 07:08 AM
The Catholic Church has been covering this up for ages. This is, IMO, what happens when you try to make someone celibate, or go against nature.
__________________
ShipOfFools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 02:58 PM   #4
Resident Photo Buff
Forum Moderator
 
Diemen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Somewhere in middle America
Posts: 13,238
Local Time: 05:08 AM
I can't decide what's more appalling, that an organization that is supposed to be populated by disciples of a loving, just God would be set up in such a way that its first instinct is to cover up any wrongdoing, or that the Church views child abuse as a sin, but not a crime.
__________________
Diemen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 03:32 PM   #5
Blue Crack Supplier
 
Irvine511's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 30,494
Local Time: 06:08 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diemen View Post
or that the Church views child abuse as a sin, but not a crime.


bingo.
__________________
Irvine511 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 03:40 PM   #6
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,294
Local Time: 06:08 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diemen View Post
or that the Church views child abuse as a sin, but not a crime.
They're free to also think that the sky is yellow, but it doesn't make it so.
__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 03:46 PM   #7
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Pearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,653
Local Time: 07:08 AM
I'm disgusted with this. I can't believe the Church cares more about standing by its celibacy rather than protecting children from monsters. It's honestly making me wonder if I should remain a Catholic or go join another church.
__________________
Pearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 03:56 PM   #8
Blue Crack Addict
 
anitram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 16,294
Local Time: 06:08 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearl View Post
It's honestly making me wonder if I should remain a Catholic or go join another church.
I long ago stopped attending Church and contributing to it financially. I do make exceptions for funeral & wedding masses or baptisms (to me they are about respect for the deceased or the couple getting married or the baby being baptized and not about religious affiliation), and if I am visiting my parents over Christmas, I will go so as to not cause conflict in that regard. Plus I actually kind of like Christmas carols and the whole season.

But I've also felt no compulsion whatsoever to join any other church or religion; frankly I feel rather unburdened. And you can still have a rich spiritual life (if that is what you want) without institutional relationships.

That said I think some part of me will always understand Catholicism as a cultural concept given my ethnicity and the strong relationship that culture and church have in the country of my birth - even though I no longer live there and haven't lived there for almost 20 years.
__________________
anitram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 04:04 PM   #9
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Pearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,653
Local Time: 07:08 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by anitram View Post
I long ago stopped attending Church and contributing to it financially. I do make exceptions for funeral & wedding masses or baptisms (to me they are about respect for the deceased or the couple getting married or the baby being baptized and not about religious affiliation), and if I am visiting my parents over Christmas, I will go so as to not cause conflict in that regard. Plus I actually kind of like Christmas carols and the whole season.

But I've also felt no compulsion whatsoever to join any other church or religion; frankly I feel rather unburdened. And you can still have a rich spiritual life (if that is what you want) without institutional relationships.

That said I think some part of me will always understand Catholicism as a cultural concept given my ethnicity and the strong relationship that culture and church have in the country of my birth - even though I no longer live there and haven't lived there for almost 20 years.
Same here. Even if I do leave the Church, part of me will always feel Catholic. I'll probably still get my ashes on Ash Wednesday and honor the Virgin Mary. I currently attend a faith sharing group at my church and if I do leave the Church, I'll probably keep going to those meetings simply because I like the people.

But with all the abuse going on and the cover-ups, I just can't find it in my conscience to continue attending its services and considering myself part of the institution.

It will be hard for my parents to accept me leaving Catholicism. When I first brought it up they flipped out. They said all other religions have their abuse problems, but the media doesn't report them because the media is anti-Catholic. My parents, particularly my dad, tends to believe Catholicism is the one true church, a belief that I never held.
__________________
Pearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 05:40 PM   #10
Rock n' Roll Doggie
VIP PASS
 
Vincent Vega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Berlin
Posts: 6,615
Local Time: 12:08 PM
This is just one of a great number of cases that are currently uncovered. It started about a month ago when the principal of the Canisius College here in Berlin, a private school of the Jesuit order, made public the abuse of several dozen of children by two former teachers at that school in the 1980s and early 90s, who were later transferred to other schools and did the same there. The principal became teacher at that school in the late 1990s and often heard rumours. He then used about every chance he had, e.g. reunions of former students, to approach them and discretely tell them if something happened to them, or they knew about it, he would be there to make it public. He was then promoted to become the principal, and when he had enough information to feel save and go forward he did so.
Since then more and more abuse cases through priests, Catholic teachers etc. became public, some dating back to the 1950s, but some also committed very recently. I have no clue, but it most approach 100 victims or so. It's a lot.
The church is only very slowly becoming active in investigating, and this article, I think, also makes it pretty apparent what kind of parallel society that is we have here, called the Catholic church. They really think they are above law and can handle everything internally, and the leader of the German Bishop Conference a few days ago even admitted systematic cover-ups of priests who abused girls and boys.
The Pope sent out a pastoral letter a few days ago to Ireland, without a word on the cases being uncovered here or in Austria or in any other country. I don't think he truly cares the least bit.
The celibacy most certainly is one of the key factors, but the Catholic church is still denying it. Even more despicable. A German theologian is a strong critic of celibacy for more than two decades now. And about 20 years ago today's pope revoked his licence to teach Catholic theology for his views on the dangers of celibacy.

Pope Forgives Molested Children | The Onion - America's Finest News Source This Onion article, from 2002 and about the cases in the US, is pretty relevant again, and I cannot help but think that this is not even far from the truth as regards the real view by the Catholic church.
__________________
Vincent Vega is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 06:43 PM   #11
ONE
love, blood, life
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,646
Local Time: 06:08 AM
YouTube - The catholic boat
__________________
Jive Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 07:48 PM   #12
Rock n' Roll Doggie
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Strong Badia
Posts: 3,430
Local Time: 11:08 AM
YouTube - THE LEAST OF THESE - apology

Best I can say.
__________________
nathan1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 08:14 PM   #13
Refugee
 
AliEnvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,320
Local Time: 11:08 AM
I repeat (from another thread recently):

Quote:
But I didn't and will not baptize my children into a church that would sooner protect its financial assets than its most vulnerable members (amongst many objectionable practices).
__________________
AliEnvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2010, 09:30 PM   #14
ONE
love, blood, life
 
financeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland
Posts: 10,122
Local Time: 12:08 PM
YouTube - Joan Osborne - One Of Us
__________________
financeguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2010, 12:40 PM   #15
Acrobat
 
Billy Rotten's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Maritimes
Posts: 454
Local Time: 08:08 AM
If the church is a disease, these are its festering, contagious sores.
__________________

__________________
Billy Rotten is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Design, images and all things inclusive copyright © Interference.com