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Old 11-29-2011, 01:49 AM   #1
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All FYM global financial crisis / recession / economic collapse talk

I figured we could use a general thread for the economic and global finance discussion we have here in this subforum, considering it's scattered around in many places.

~

I'll start off with this gem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=XztrTGXl29U#

Alternate titles for this video include:

"Can you feel the double-dip coming?"

"We're all fucked"

"Are you sure we really want to keep the Mexis out of the US, I think they might bring a little class to the country with them"
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Old 11-29-2011, 10:43 AM   #2
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I can start it.

Eurozone debt web: Who owes what to whom? (includes the US, the UK and Japan)
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Old 11-29-2011, 01:19 PM   #3
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^ I was surprised to see how much Greek, Italian and Spanish debt France holds...knew it was bad, didn't realize they were that exposed.



Specific to US political discourse on the crisis:

Washington Post (Barry Ritholtz), Nov. 19
Quote:
The big lie of the financial crisis, of course, is that troubling technique used to try to change the narrative history and shift blame from the bad ideas and terrible policies that created it.
Quote:
Consider the causes cited by those who’ve taken up the big lie. Take for example New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s statement that it was Congress that forced banks to make ill-advised loans to people who could not afford them and defaulted in large numbers. He and others claim that caused the crisis. Others have suggested these were to blame: the home mortgage interest deduction, the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, the 1994 Housing and Urban Development memo, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) and homeownership targets set by both the Clinton and Bush administrations.

When an economy booms or busts, money gets misspent, assets rise in prices, fortunes are made. Out of all that comes a set of easy-to-discern facts. Here are key things we know based on data. Together, they present a series of tough hurdles for the big lie proponents.

• The boom and bust was global.



Proponents of the Big Lie ignore the worldwide nature of the housing boom and bust. A McKinsey Global Institute report noted “from 2000 through 2007, a remarkable run-up in global home prices occurred.” It is highly unlikely that a simultaneous boom and bust everywhere else in the world was caused by one set of factors (ultra-low rates, securitized AAA-rated subprime, derivatives) but had a different set of causes in the United States. Indeed, this might be the biggest obstacle to pushing the false narrative. How did US regulations against redlining in inner cities also cause a boom in Spain, Ireland and Australia? How can we explain the boom occurring in countries that do not have a tax deduction for mortgage interest or government-sponsored enterprises? And why, after nearly a century of mortgage interest deduction in the United States, did it suddenly cause a crisis?

These questions show why proximity and statistical validity are so important. Let’s get more specific.The Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 is a favorite boogeyman for some, despite the numbers that so easily disprove it as a cause. It is a statistical invalid argument, as the data show. For example, if the CRA was to blame, the housing boom would have been in CRA regions; it would have made places such as Harlem and South Philly and Compton and inner Washington the primary locales of the run up and collapse. Further, the default rates in these areas should have been worse than other regions.



What occurred was the exact opposite: The suburbs boomed and busted and went into foreclosure in much greater numbers than inner cities. The tiny suburbs and exurbs of South Florida and California and Las Vegas and Arizona were the big boomtowns, not the low-income regions. The redlined areas the CRA address missed much of the boom; places that busted had nothing to do with the CRA. The market share of financial institutions that were subject to the CRA has steadily declined since the legislation was passed in 1977. As noted by Abromowitz & Min, CRA-regulated institutions, primarily banks and thrifts, accounted for only 28% of all mortgages originated in 2006.

• Nonbank mortgage underwriting exploded from 2001 to 2007, along with the private label securitization market, which eclipsed Fannie and Freddie during the boom. Check the mortgage origination data: The vast majority of subprime mortgages—the loans at the heart of the global crisis—were underwritten by unregulated private firms. These were lenders who sold the bulk of their mortgages to Wall Street, not to Fannie or Freddie. Indeed, these firms had no deposits, so they were not under the jurisdiction of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp or the Office of Thrift Supervision. The relative market share of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac dropped from a high of 57% of all new mortgage originations in 2003, down to 37% as the bubble was developing in 2005-06.

• Private lenders not subject to congressional regulations collapsed lending standards. Taking up that extra share were nonbanks selling mortgages elsewhere, not to the GSEs. Conforming mortgages had rules that were less profitable than the newfangled loans. Private securitizers—competitors of Fannie and Freddie—grew from 10% of the market in 2002 to nearly 40% in 2006. As a percentage of all mortgage-backed securities, private securitization grew from 23% in 2003 to 56% in 2006. These firms had business models that could be called “Lend-in-order-to-sell-to-Wall-Street-securitizers.” They offered all manner of nontraditional mortgages—the 2/28 adjustable rate mortgages, piggy-back loans, negative amortization loans. These defaulted in huge numbers, far more than the regulated mortgage writers did. Consider a study by McClatchy: It found that more than 84% of the subprime mortgages in 2006 were issued by private lending. These private firms made nearly 83% of the subprime loans to low- and moderate-income borrowers that year. And McClatchy found that out of the top 25 subprime lenders in 2006, only one was subject to the usual mortgage laws and regulations.



A 2008 analysis found that the nonbank underwriters made more than 12 million subprime mortgages with a value of nearly $2 trillion. The lenders who made these were exempt from federal regulations. A study by the Federal Reserve shows that more than 84% of the subprime mortgages in 2006 were issued by private lending institutions. The study found that the government-sponsored enterprises were concerned with the loss of market share to these private lenders—Fannie and Freddie were chasing profits, not trying to meet low-income lending goals.

Beyond the overwhelming data that private lenders made the bulk of the subprime loans to low-income borrowers, we still have the proximate cause issue. If we cannot blame housing policies from the 1930s or mortgage tax deductibility from even before that, then what else can we blame? Mass consumerism? Incessant advertising? The post-World War II suburban automobile culture? MTV’s “Cribs”? Just how attenuated must a factor be before fair-minded people are willing to eliminate it as a prime cause?
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Old 11-29-2011, 04:07 PM   #4
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It is surprising and curious that Greece's and Portugal's (and Portugal owes it to Spain... our neighbour, knowing that Portugal and Spain are economically dependant on each other) - the first economies being attacked and hijacked - debts are peanuts compared to bigger economies which have colossal debts. Isn't it?
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Old 11-29-2011, 04:26 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yolland View Post
^ I was surprised to see how much Greek, Italian and Spanish debt France holds...knew it was bad, didn't realize they were that exposed.



Specific to US political discourse on the crisis:

Washington Post (Barry Ritholtz), Nov. 19
So, the cause seems to be irresponsibility by those who were not subject to regulation?
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