Should T-Bone Burnett Produce a U2 Album? - Page 2 - U2 Feedback

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Old 01-09-2012, 08:20 AM   #16
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The only thing I know about T-Bone Burnett is that he did the O Brother Where Art Thou? soundtrack. So, no.
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:02 AM   #17
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I don't agree with your reasoning, as a partnership with LA Reid isn't going to necessarily do anything to expand their audience. They'll still be making a U2 album.

Having said that I'm not averse to the idea..Reid has been behind a heck of alot of my favorite music, so I'd be curious to hear it..

love this oldie from him..maybe he could help Bono write another WOWY

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Old 01-27-2012, 12:37 AM   #18
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Absolutely not.

I respect T-Bone Burnett as a musician and I respect what he's trying to do. I think the artists he works with are fantastic and he inspires them to write song good songs (Jakob Dylan and John Mellencamp come to mind).

It's just that sonically, he most certainly has a unique sound. Unfortunately it's not a sound I care for.

If U2 were to work with T-Bone for an album, prepare for heavy reverb on just about everything and Adam's (probably acoustic) bass to be shoved so high in the mix that The Edge will be barely audible. No thank you.
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:04 AM   #19
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But they already did rootsy with Rattle and Hum, unless they wanted to try it again and do better.

Honestly, though, if I heard that U2 were going to make that kind of music again, I would respond with a yawn.
Except with the experience they have now, a Rattle and Hum type of sound would actually work this time.
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:31 AM   #20
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It worked fine last time.

Just cut out the pointless live tracks and busking bluesmen and you're good to go.
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Old 02-06-2012, 05:24 AM   #21
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It worked fine last time.

.
Exactly. U2 dream of releasing an album as universally beloved, as that one was back in the day, ever again. People on this board who read the official band history have a tilted view of the album and the era, but Rattle and Hum was a massive creative and financial success.

It spawned some of what continue to be the band's most popular songs.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:30 AM   #22
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It worked fine last time.

Just cut out the pointless live tracks and busking bluesmen and you're good to go.
Qute right!

On a slightly different note, i'd like to see Flood back, maybe not as the main producer but certailnly as a co-producer.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:31 PM   #23
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Exactly. U2 dream of releasing an album as universally beloved, as that one was back in the day, ever again. People on this board who read the official band history have a tilted view of the album and the era, but Rattle and Hum was a massive creative and financial success.

It spawned some of what continue to be the band's most popular songs.
People bought records back then. Of course they won't sell as much now.

Financial success ? Definitely. Creative ? Doubtful. By the critics' - and the band's opinion - the whole "4 whiteys do the blues" route proved a dead end. (the big time movie didn't help matters of course, but the point remains)

If anything, Rattle and Hum, had it not been for the bounce back of AB, would likely spell the end of U2, given their exhaustion by the end of Lovetown.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:20 PM   #24
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People bought records back then. Of course they won't sell as much now.

Financial success ? Definitely. Creative ? Doubtful. By the critics' - and the band's opinion - the whole "4 whiteys do the blues" route proved a dead end. (the big time movie didn't help matters of course, but the point remains)

If anything, Rattle and Hum, had it not been for the bounce back of AB, would likely spell the end of U2, given their exhaustion by the end of Lovetown.
Nonsense. The singles from R&H were being constantly played on the radio, MTV, and were world famous. A few critics criticized the album and movie, which really stung the band, but back in the day, every U2 fan I knew loved the album - casual fans and fanatics. Random people on the street had good things to say about it. To this day, All I Want is You, Desire, and When Love Comes to Town are 3 of the bands more famous and popular songs.

And Lovetown was a short tour.

I never heard anyone say a bad word about the album, aside from Siskel and Ebert, until years later.

Zooropa was the album the casual fan, and many of the fanatics, had a problem with back in the day.
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:23 PM   #25
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Nonsense. ... I never heard anyone say a bad word about the album, aside from Siskel and Ebert, until years later.
Have you read "U2 at the End of the World" (or watched "From the Sky Down")? It's a good summary of U2 at the time -- and Flanagan's perspective on the band confirms the notion of a band in crisis, as well as a band on the rebound after a critical and commercial backlash. Creatively, the band had dried up, having gone down a musical road they weren't interested in pursuing any further. And there were indeed bad reviews of the album -- most notably the New York Times and the Village Voice. According to interviews in Carter Alan's "U2 in America" (another helpful source on U2's cultural standing post-"Rattle and Hum"), there was a huge backlash against the band publicly, and Island wasn't sure what to do about the future.

Now What? (Rolling Stone article, 1989)

Hating U2 (Spin article, 1989)

This article from the LA Times in 1991 is telling too:

'New U2' Album Is So New It's Illegal

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...Bob Say, general manager of the trend-setting Moby Disc record store chain, says ..."We barely sell any of their records anymore. It's the same with Bruce Springsteen -- it's almost embarrassing how few albums he sells."
If anything, I think there's been a bit of retroactive whitewashing in terms of what that period of time was like for the band.
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Old 02-11-2012, 06:35 PM   #26
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Have you read "U2 at the End of the World" (or watched "From the Sky Down")? It's a good summary of U2 at the time -- and Flanagan's perspective on the band confirms the notion of a band in crisis, as well as a band on the rebound after a critical and commercial backlash. Creatively, the band had dried up, having gone down a musical road they weren't interested in pursuing any further. And there were indeed bad reviews of the album -- most notably the New York Times and the Village Voice. According to interviews in Carter Alan's "U2 in America" (another helpful source on U2's cultural standing post-"Rattle and Hum"), there was a huge backlash against the band publicly, and Island wasn't sure what to do about the future.

Now What? (Rolling Stone article, 1989)

Hating U2 (Spin article, 1989)

This article from the LA Times in 1991 is telling too:

'New U2' Album Is So New It's Illegal



If anything, I think there's been a bit of retroactive whitewashing in terms of what that period of time was like for the band.
Yeah, I have. Look, there may have been a few critics back in the day, like I said those reviews really stung the band, but everything I said was true. The album was beloved far and wide. I remember.
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Old 02-12-2012, 05:33 AM   #27
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Nonsense. The singles from R&H were being constantly played on the radio, MTV, and were world famous. A few critics criticized the album and movie, which really stung the band, but back in the day, every U2 fan I knew loved the album - casual fans and fanatics. Random people on the street had good things to say about it. To this day, All I Want is You, Desire, and When Love Comes to Town are 3 of the bands more famous and popular songs.

And Lovetown was a short tour.

I never heard anyone say a bad word about the album, aside from Siskel and Ebert, until years later.

Zooropa was the album the casual fan, and many of the fanatics, had a problem with back in the day.
Agreed.

Didn't Rattle and Hum sell about 17 million copies? all the singles were massive hits in Europe, popular amongst fans and non-fans of the band, even the film was seen by a lot of people and I wasn't aware of it being critically panned that much at the time.
All this talk of Rattle and Hum being such a big turkey is not how I remember it being viewed at the time, not by a long way. Pop was slagged off a lot more.
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Old 02-13-2012, 10:18 AM   #28
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That "Hating U2" interview is great.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:33 AM   #29
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"I mean, I like the songs, but this is only a fraction of what we can do. It's like a little Polaroid of U2."


Damn, U2 was hungry back then. Even after a massive album like the Joshua Tree, the band was not content. They seem to almost belittle their past. I don't feel like U2 is anywhere near that cocksure anymore. Should they be? I have no idea. I don't know what they've got to lose.
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Old 02-18-2012, 08:19 PM   #30
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Didn't Rattle and Hum sell about 17 million copies? all the singles were massive hits in Europe, popular amongst fans and non-fans of the band, even the film was seen by a lot of people and I wasn't aware of it being critically panned that much at the time.
All this talk of Rattle and Hum being such a big turkey is not how I remember it being viewed at the time, not by a long way. Pop was slagged off a lot more.
That's absolutely right. I think younger fans (bless 'em) who weren't there at the time have a distorted perception -- partly based on U2's own self-mythologizing -- that R&H was this big disaster, when in fact it was one of the most successful albums of the 80s by a rock band, in commercial terms. Now, in artistic terms we could debate its relative merits (I personally think the studio cuts are the best work they've ever done), and the whole concept of the live + studio + film project was a bit of overkill, but none of this harmed the band's profile at the time. If anything, it got bigger. After R&H, they were the world's biggest band, with the biggest profile.

Pop was a completely different story, as it failed to generate much interest at all from the mainstream, and got a mixed reaction from the committed fanbase. It clearly did not galvanize the masses as the 1988/89 stuff did, and it greatly lessened U2's "profile".
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